One Match swab kit in the mail

Here’s what you get in the mail: Cotton swabs, labels and a pamphlet to insert your swab samples.

The trickiest part is to embed the cotton swab into the slots.  It might be easier to press in the slots with a card of some sort before you try to put the cotton swab in.  Some of these don’t work very well and it’s frustrating to put in!

How to do a swab test from onematch.ca

This video was shot by another leukemia patient, Stephen Pho’s, cousin

Minority Statistics

This is taken from the Project Michelle Website

MINORITY REGISTRANT STATISTICS – As of August 2007

Race

Donors Registered

% of Total

Number of Transplants

Black or African American

511,622

9.4%

819

Asian American

455,494

8.5%

496

South Asian

105,796

2.0%

25

Filipino (Philipino)

37,336

0.7%

53

Japanese

31,513

0.6%

112

Korean

59,778

1.1%

47

Chinese

70,843

1.4%

50

Other Southeast Asian

32,941

0.6%

44

Vietnamese

8,161

0.2%

8

Unspec. Asian/Pacific Islander

96,612

1.6%

157

Multiple Asian/Pacific Islander

12,514

0.2%

-

Caucasian

4,933,848

67.3%

13,388

Hispanic

391,128

7.1%

765

National Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander

78,792

1.4%

18

American Indian/Alaska Native

8,731

0.2%

77

Other

26,475

0.4%

208

Multiple Race

177,678

3.4%

-

Declines

36,419

0.7%

265

Unknown

125,763

1.7%

708

TOTAL

6,745,950

100%

16,744

Information and Resources in Vietnamese

Information and Resources in Vietnamese

Donor Information

Take the First Step Vietnamese Take The First Step (PDF)
Steps of Marrow Donation - Vietnamese (PDF) Steps of Donation (PDF)
Donor Education Marrow Donors Save Lives (PDF)
Myths & Facts - Vietnamese (PDF) Donation Myths & Facts (PDF)

Patient Resources

How the Office of Patient Advocacy Can Help You (PDF)
Patient Frequently Asked Questions (PDF)

To view PDF documents you will need Adobe Reader.

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Bệnh u tủy

About Stem Cell Donation

The Registration Process

The Donor Experience

Why Join?

What is A.L.L.?

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of blood cells. ALL involves a type of white blood cell called a lymphocyte. Acute means that it develops and advances quickly, and requires immediate treatment.


Normally, lymphocytes and other blood cells are produced by the bone marrow  in a controlled fashion. However, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, this process is abnormal and large numbers of immature and abnormal lymphocytes (lymphoblasts) are produced and released into the blood stream.  These cells cannot perform their usual functions and their overproduction prevents the bone marrow from producing other important blood cells.  The lymphoblasts can collect and injure certain other areas of the body, such as the brain, spinal cord, and lymph nodes (glands).


Stem cell transplantation, also called bone marrow transplantation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, is a treatment in which the patient is given very high doses of chemotherapy or total body radiation. This kills cancer cells but also destroys all normal cells developing in the bone marrow. This means that the body’s normal source of blood cells (the bone marrow) is no longer functional.


After the treatment, the patient requires a supply of healthy young blood cells (called stem cells) to be reintroduced, or transplanted.

Knowing Is Half the Battle

Here are some important Facts about this cause.

Fact: Every year, hundreds of Canadians need stem cell transplants to treat potentially life-threatening illnesses including cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma and diseases such as aplastic anemia, immune dysfunctions and genetic disorders.

Fact: Fewer than 30% of patients will find a compatible donor from a family member, 70% rely on the generosity an unrelated donor for available sources of stem cells.

Fact: The number of transplants for Canadian patients continues to climb.

Fact: Patients from Vietnamese heritage are more likely to find a donor in their own ethnic group.

Fact: There are two stem cell products that OneMatch donors can provide at the present time; stem cells from the bone marrow and stem cells obtained from circulating blood. All blood cells develop from these very immature, unspecialized stem cells.

What you can do

Step One:
Donate blood today. Most patients will need blood and blood product transfusion support while waiting to be matched for a stem cell transplant. Call 1 888 2 DONATE for a blood donor clinic near you today.

Step Two: Register on the OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network now. It’s simple to do by going to onematch.ca and follow the instructions.

You can be the one to help someone in your community now by becoming a stem cell donor